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WSLC Reports Today
Updated DAILY... Almost Every Day™ by 9 a.m. 

Links are functional at date of posting, but sometimes expire. Some links require free registration. WSLC Reports Today links to stories of interest to organized labor; some positive, some negative.  The intention is to inform.



MONDAY, MAY 15  ■  Endorsement results from Saturday's WSLC COPE Convention
■  In today's Seattle Times -- Political novice Darcy Burner takes on GOP's Reichert --
At 35, Burner has emerged from obscurity in the past four months to become a Democratic Party darling.

Medicare Part D news:  ■  Protest TODAY at Rep. Reichert's office in Mercer Island 
■  Today from AP -- Drug benefit deadline prompts debate over penalty -- A pivotal Republican (NOT Rep. Reichert, McMorris or Hastings) joins the congressional drive to eliminate the financial penalty for people who miss today's deadline for enrolling in a Medicare drug plan. Also see Bender's May column: Welcome (at the point of a gun) to Medicare's drug disaster!

Local news:
■  In the PS Business Journal -- Farmers fear worker shortage (alternate headline: Farmers fear paying more) -- Area agribusiness lobbyist says the state minimum wage brings the pay scale of service or retail jobs close to the $8- or $9-an-hour rates that orchard owners pay for nonharvest jobs such as pruning. When the minimum wage was in the range of $5 an hour (read: the "good old days"), field work seemed much more desirable to workers, despite the rough conditions and lack of consistency. But now many former farmworkers are opting for the steady paycheck elsewhere.
■  In today's Seattle Times -- Price of Boeing scandals: $615 million U.S. penalty -- Boeing agrees to pay $615 million to settle the federal investigations into contracting scandals.
■  In today's Seattle Times -- A new twist in state labor relations (editorial) -- SEIU, which is trying to organize the Providence hospitals, was in Olympia Thursday trying to stop Providence from financing an expansion. As a labor practice -- if that is what it is -- this is new, and troubling.
■  In today's Spokesman-Review -- Pension tension (editorial) -- Rather than extend the cost of that (gain sharing) lesson, the state's political leaders need to muster the courage to cut the program entirely. Some members of the state pension policy board want to salvage 50 percent of the benefit. But it makes no sense to finance a relatively new benefit when the state cannot keep up with payments on the old benefits. The good news is that Gregoire appears to be taking a tough stand, even though it could cost her support among state employee unions.
■  In the Seattle P-I -- Don't confuse right-to-work issue with basic human rights (letter... scroll down)
■  In Saturday's Everett Herald -- Clerks take case to county campus -- Members of the court clerks union picket before a new round of contract talks on Monday.

National news:
■  At AFL-CIO Now -- Your action stopped the Enzi bill -- Hill insiders who followed the debate say phone calls and messages from senators’ home states helped persuade some wavering lawmakers to maintain their opposition. The bill would have allowed health insurers to bypass state requirements for minimum benefits, eliminating key benefits in coverage, including cancer screenings, contraception, emergency services, mental health care and diabetic supplies.
■  In today's Seattle P-I -- Federal budget: Reckless tax cuts (editorial) -- "Every dollar of debt is a dollar that our children will see in higher taxes, decreased spending or reduced economic growth," says the bipartisan Concord Coalition. "We've accumulated trillions of these dollars, and the time to stop procrastinating is here." But these arguments mean nothing to the majority party in Congress. They cling to this fantasy that tax cuts will solve all problems. The president is expected to sign the bill at a grand ceremony on Wednesday. Will he sign it in red ink?
■  In today's Seattle P-I -- Guest worker program threatens union solidarity (SF Chronicle story)
■  In today's Washington Post -- UAW President Gettelfinger presides over painful changes
■  In the NY Times -- No holds barred (editorial) -- The choices being forced on Delphi workers are extreme, and the temptation for management to pack up and move overseas is powerful. This struggle exemplifies wrenching changes in our economy that everyone watches with trepidation.
■  In today's NY Times -- About that free trade... (editorial) -- Global talks to liberalize farm and industrial trade are on life support, and there is not a single character in the cast of supposed free-trade advocates around the world willing to step up and be the doctor.

 

 


 

Last week: Monday, 5/8 -- Tuesday, 5/9 -- Wednesday, 5/10 -- Thursday, 5/11 -- Friday, 5/12 -- Saturday, 5/13

 

MONDAY,  MAY 15, 2006
Endorsement results from 2006 WSLC COPE Convention

Hundreds of union delegates from around the State of Washington gathered in SeaTac on Saturday for the Washington State Labor Council’s 2006 Convention of the Committee on Political Education (COPE).  Delegates representing WSLC-affiliated unions debated and voted upon endorsements for the 2006 elections for Congress, State Legislature, State Supreme Court and ballot measures.  A two-thirds majority of delegates present and voting was necessary for endorsement of a candidate or ballot measure.

Delegates will again convene to consider further endorsement action at the WSLC's annual convention August 21-24 at the WestCoast Wenatchee Hotel.

Following is a list of candidates and ballot measures endorsed Saturday by the Washington State Labor Council:

CONGRESS:

Senate – Maria Cantwell
1CD – Jay Inslee
2CD – Rick Larsen
3CD – Brian Baird
4CD – Claude Oliver and Richard Wright (dual)
5CD – Peter Goldmark
6CD – Norm Dicks
7CD – Jim McDermott
8CD – Darcy Burner
9CD – Adam Smith  

JUDICIAL:

STATE SUPREME COURT
Pos. 2 – Susan Owens
Pos. 8 – Gerry Alexander
Pos. 9 – Tom Chambers

COURT OF APPEALS
Dist. 3, Div. 2 – Joel Penoyer

BALLOT MEASURES:

Initiative 917 ($30 car tabs) – Vote NO

Initiative 920 (repealing estate tax) – Vote NO

Initiative 933 (takings) – Vote NO

Initiative 937 (renewable energy resources) – no action

Initiative 946 (anti- immigration) – Vote NO

Referendum 65 (civil rights legislation) – DECLINE TO SIGN


 

STATE LEGISLATURE:

1st DISTRICT
House 1 – Al O’Brien
House 2 – Mark Ericks

2nd DISTRICT
House 1 – no action
House 2 – Tom Campbell

3rd DISTRICT
House 1 – Alex Wood
House 2 – Timm Ormsby

4th DISTRICT
House 1 – no action
House 2 – Edward Foote

5th DISTRICT
House 1 – no action
House 2 – no action

6th DISTRICT
House 1 – no action
House 2 – Don Barlow
Senate – Chris Marr

7th DISTRICT
House 1 – Jack Miller
House 2 – no action
Senate – no action

8th DISTRICT
House 1 – Shirley Hankins
House 2 – Larry Haler  
Senate – no action

9th DISTRICT
House 1 – no action
House 2 – no action  

10th DISTRICT
House 1 – no action
House 2 – no action

11th DISTRICT
House 1 – Zack Hudgins
House 2 – Bob Hasegawa

12th DISTRICT
House 1 – no action
House 2 – no action

13th DISTRICT
House 1 – no action
House 2 – no action
Senate – Lisa Bowen

14th DISTRICT
House 1 – no action
House 2 – no action

15th DISTRICT
House 1 – no action
House 2 – no action
Senate – Tomas Villanueva

16th DISTRICT
House 1 – no action
House 2 – Bill Grant
Senate – no action

17th DISTRICT
House 1 – Jack Burkman
House 2 – Deb Wallace

18th DISTRICT
House 1 – Richard Curtis (limited endorsement)
House 2 – Julianne McCord

19th DISTRICT
House 1 – Dean Takko
House 2 – Brian Blake

20th DISTRICT
House 1 – Mike Rechner
House 2 – no action

21st DISTRICT
House 1 – Mary Helen Roberts
House 2 – Brian Sullivan
Senate – Paull Shin

22nd DISTRICT
House 1 – Brendan Williams
House 2 – Sam Hunt

23rd DISTRICT
House 1 – Sherry Appleton
House 2 – Christine Rolfes

24th DISTRICT
House 1 – Kevin VandeWege
House 2 – Lynn Kessler 

25th DISTRICT
House 1 – no action
House 2 – Dawn Morrell

26th DISTRICT
House 1 – Patricia Lantz
House 2 – Larry Seaquist 
Senate – Derek Kilmer

27th DISTRICT
House 1 – Dennis Flannigan
House 2 – Jeannie Darneille

28th DISTRICT
House 1 – Troy Kelley
House 2 – Tami Green

29th DISTRICT
House 1 – Steve Conway
House 2 – Steve Kirby
Senate – Rosa Franklin

30th DISTRICT
House 1 – Mark Miloscia
House 2 – Skip Priest (limited, conditional endorsement)
Senate – Tracey Eide 

31st DISTRICT
House 1 – Karen Willard
House 2 – Christopher Hurst
Senate – Pam Roach

32nd DISTRICT
House 1 – Maralyn Chase
House 2 – Ruth Kagi
Senate – Darlene Fairley

33rd DISTRICT
House 1 – Shay Schual-Berke
House 2 – Dave Upthegrove Senate – Karen Keiser

34th DISTRICT
House 1 – Eileen Cody
House 2 – Joe McDermott
Senate – Erik Poulsen

35th DISTRICT
House 1 – Kathy Haigh
House 2 – Bill Eickmeyer
Senate – Kyle Lucas

36th DISTRICT
House 1 – Helen Sommers
House 2 – Mary Lou Dickerson
Senate – Jeanne Kohl-Welles

37th DISTRICT
House 1 – Sharon Tomiko-Santos (conditional)
House 2 – Eric Pettigrew
Senate – Adam Kline

38th DISTRICT
House 1 – John McCoy
House 2 – Michael Sells
Senate – Jean Berkey

39th DISTRICT
House 1 – no action
House 2 – no action

40th DISTRICT
House 1 – Dave Quall
House 2 – no action

41st DISTRICT
House 1 – Fred Jarrett
House 2 – Judy Clibborn

42nd DISTRICT
House 1 – Jaspar MacSlarrow
House 2 – Kelli Linville
Senate – Jesse Salomon

43rd DISTRICT
House 1 – Lynne Dodson
House 2 – Frank Chopp
Senate – Ed Murray

44th DISTRICT
House 1 – Hans Dunshee
House 2 – John Lovick
Senate – Steve Hobbs

45th DISTRICT
House 1 – no action
House 2 – Larry Springer
Senate – Eric Oemig

46th DISTRICT
House 1 – Jim McIntire
House 2 – Phyllis Kenney
Senate – Ken Jacobsen

47th DISTRICT
House 1 – Geoff Simpson
House 2 – Patrick Sullivan
Senate – Ed Crawford  

48th DISTRICT
House 1 – Ross Hunter
House 2 – Deb Eddy
Senate – Rodney Tom

49th DISTRICT
House 1 – Bill Fromhold
House 2 – Jim Moeller

Conditional endorsements are based upon the condition that the candidate complete and return his or her questionnaire.

 

If you have news items regarding unions or workplace issues in Washington state that you would like to see posted here, please submit them via e-mail to David Groves or via fax to 206-285-5805.

Copyright © 2006   Washington State Labor Council, AFL-CIO